Why we save raw tapes

Media Burn has over 7,000 videos.

Thousands are RAW TAPES, camera original video from the day and time it was produced. It’s rare for anyone besides the producer to ever get a chance to see the raw tapes. That’s one of the underlying principles of what we do. Raw tapes show and tell historical context.

Almost always, dozens of hours (sometimes hundreds) of videos are shot for a 30 or 60 minute edited version. We preserve the camera original videos for their ongoing value beyond the segments that have been included in a documentary or TV show.

In this example, Bill Murray is doing a short opening for a pilot of the TV series, Wired In. It was done in 1982 by Elan Soltes in New York. It’s a clear example of how raw tape is still valuable 35 years later. Several takes are followed by the way it turned out on the program pilot.

This weekend, Media Burn will be presenting at the American Library Association Conference at Chicago’s McCormick Place.

Distributing Archives: Preservation, Restoration, and Access is presented by the Association of Moving Image Archivists and co-sponsored by Video Round Table. The panel will discuss organizations acting as both archives and distributors of moving image materials. Bret Wood will focus on Kino Lorber’s restoration process for the “Pioneers of African-American Cinema” project. Antonella Bonfanti will speak on preserving the medium of motion picture film exhibition and her work at Canyon Cinema. Sara Chapman will offer a less traditional model of distribution with Chicago-based Media Burn Archive. Attendees will learn about the challenges for media content providers that are also caretakers of their holdings; the difference between preservation and restoration of moving images; and the importance of preserving motion picture film and the projection experience.

 

1 Comment

  1. i worked at riverview on the flying turns how can get a copy?

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