Home » Posts tagged 'television'

  • Nixon resigns, August 8, 1974

    Nixon resigns, August 8, 1974

    Forty years ago today, Richard Nixon resigned as President of the United States. Millions tuned in to his televised address to see what Nixon had to say about his presidency and his reasons for resigning. What they didn’t see was the seven minutes of the television pool feed before Nixon went live. It’s a fascinating counterpoint to the gravity of the event and a unique look at Nixon’s mindset at this defining moment of his career. The video also includes … Continue reading

  • Super Sonic, etc.

    Super Sonic, etc.

    There are two sections of note in this footage. First some footage of a TV being changed through several different channels at the time of the Gulf War and second a performer on the Venice Beach Boardwalk. The rest of the video is the filmmaker chatting with friends around Los Angeles on Super Bowl Sunday. Continue reading

  • Essential election viewing: Brian Springer’s Spin (1995)

    Essential election viewing: Brian Springer’s Spin (1995)

    In the early ’90s, media artist Brian Springer learned that, with a home satellite dish, it was possible to pick up and record the raw satellite feeds created by the TV networks. These parallel feeds included the behind-the-scenes signals sent to the TV shows’ control rooms but not intended for broadcast, such as talk show sets during commercial breaks or people waiting to be patched in to an interview with a news anchor. Springer recorded these feeds throughout the 1992 … Continue reading

  • VIDEO preview of Studs’ Place screening

    VIDEO preview of Studs’ Place screening

    STUDS’ PLACE: LOST AND FOUND SEPTEMBER 5, 5:30-7:30pm FREE ADMISSION Free non-alcoholic beverages Birthday cheesecake courtesy of Eli’s Cheesecake   Museum of Broadcast Communications 360 N. State St., Chicago, IL guarantee your seats by rsvp’ing to info@mediaburn.org Studs’ Place: Lost and Found on Sept 5 1 ratings 4 views Join us next Wednesday for this fun night of stories and television hosted by Rick Kogan and Tom Weinberg. Until this discovery of four additional episodes of Studs’ Place, only ten … Continue reading

  • Studs’ Place: Jimmy Romano is Home – The Living City

    Studs’ Place: Jimmy Romano is Home – The Living City

    Studs’ Place (1951?) produced by Charlie Andrews. This episode is called “Jimmy Romano Is Home.” A neighborhood kid comes back from college on the East Coast and suffers embarrassment over his working class roots. Eventually he realizes the people in his neighborhood have more talent than he thought. Features musical performances by Chet Roble and Win Stracke. Followed by “The Living City” (1953). Instructional film dealing with urban problems such as how are existing slums to be eliminated, how to deal with congestion, etc. “How did our cities get this way?” “I was in bombed out cities in Europe in the war. And then I came back to Chicago to this.” We need to tear down the slums, and build up new affordable housing. Studs Terkel narrates. Continue reading

  • L.A. “Trash” tape

    L.A. “Trash” tape

    This tape features footage that had been taped off of Los Angeles and Chicago TV stations during the production of TVTV’s “Adland.” Continue reading

  • Media Burn by Ant Farm, 2003 edit

    Media Burn by Ant Farm, 2003 edit

    A recent edit (2003) of Ant Farm’s classic video art piece examining and satirizing the media, particularly the impact of television. On July 4, Independence Day, 1975, what a TV newscaster described as a “media circus” assembles at San Francisco’s Cow Palace Stadium. A pyramid of television sets are stacked, doused with kerosene, and set ablaze. Then a modified 1959 Cadillac El Dorado Biarritz, piloted by two drivers who are guided only by a video monitor between their bucket seats, smashes through the pyramid destroying the TV sets. Continue reading

  • Image Union, episode 0329

    Image Union, episode 0329

    Compilation episode of Image Union featuring the work of Ellen and Lynda Kahn, Max Almy, Norman Magdon and Tom Erickson, Richard Serra and Carlota Fay Schoolman, Jane Veeder, and Bart Friedman and Nancy Cain. Continue reading