[Once a Star raw: NBA Legends #12 Dallas]

Raw footage for the 1986 television special "Once a Star" in Dallas during the 1986 NBA All-Star Weekend. This is a continuation of footage interviewing television executive Bob Wussler (1936-2010).

00:00Copy video clip URL Color bars and tone.

00:40Copy video clip URL Wussler sits on a couch in a hotel lobby. He and producer Tom Weinberg begin to talk about the television world. Wussler thinks that producing is the most fun aspect of television, which he doesn’t do as much anymore because he is an executive. Wussler also begins to talk about his involvement in covering the Goodwill Games (created by Ted Turner).

02:42Copy video clip URL Wussler talks about the Russian executives he works with during the Goodwill Games. “The Soviet system does not allow for middle management.” Weinberg questions Wussler about the logistics in working with television executives in the Soviet system.

04:25Copy video clip URL Weinberg asks Wussler about three players involved in the NBA Legends game: Connie Hawkins, Nate Thurmond, and Cazzie Russell. Wussler first talks about Hawkins, saying he’s a wonderful player who was deprived of a marvelous career. He goes on to say that Cazzie Russell lacked desire and that he would’ve liked to have seen him play longer in the NBA. Weinberg and Wussler talk about Russell’s superstar ability, and Wussler calls Pete Maravich the “Great White Hope.”

06:43Copy video clip URL Weinberg asks Wussler about how being on the road affects him. “I don’t think being on the road is hell. That’s a choice we all make. If being on the road is hell for somebody, then my advice is [to] get off the road. Go get a job that doesn’t require you to be on the road so much. I enjoy seeing the world. I enjoy reading other newspapers. I enjoy what it’s done for my life and given me the global perspective, or the whatever that you have.” Wussler goes on to briefly talk about MGM Studios before getting cut off.

14:32Copy video clip URL Wussler talks about the creation of WTBS and the formation of other television stations. Weinberg eventually asks Wussler if there is any room for mid-level television stations. Wussler thinks there is a market for such stations, and their content would possibly be more regional.

17:09Copy video clip URL Weinberg comments on how television and its rating system are not geographical. Wussler states that there is a statistical measure for audience, but no qualitative measure, even though television ultimately has to satisfy the public. He and Weinberg also discuss the tradition behind Chicago’s WGN.

20:01Copy video clip URL Tape ends.



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