[Title IX]

In recognition of their accomplishments, Indiana University honors its pre-Title IX female athletes with varsity letters. Women's participation in college sports has quadrupled since the passing of Title IX, but gender inequity in college sports remains a problem.

0:07Copy video clip URL Twenty-five years after Title IX was passed, banning gender discrimination in education, women’s participation in college sports has quadrupled. Indiana University recently awarded varsity letters to its pre-Title IX female athletes, including Cynthia Potter and Lesley Bush, Olympic divers who had been unable to compete for Indiana University or get a scholarship.

3:06Copy video clip URL Potter and Bush’s coach, Hobie Billingsley, was one of the first coaches in the country to coach women on the collegiate level. Billingsley remembers the negative reaction of fellow coach James Counsilman when he began coaching women in 1960, and spent 17 years coaching women for no pay.

4:28Copy video clip URL Female divers at Indiana University now have a full intercollegiate schedule and just as many scholarships as male divers. They also provide many scholarships for female basketball players, and with the newly established WNBA, opportunities for women continue to grow.

6:01Copy video clip URL Despite the gains made under Title IX, only seven Division 1 schools met the Title IX standard for gender equity. Indiana University athletic director Clarence Doninger says that the problem is football, since there are no women’s sports which are comparable in terms of costs and revenue. Billingsley worries that adding more programs for women will negatively affect non-revenue men’s programs, and thinks these schools should eliminate men’s football scholarships, because “it’s a business, it’s not sports.”

8:47Copy video clip URL Indiana University hopes to reach gender equity in their sports programs by 2004.

9:34Copy video clip URL End of tape.

 

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