Home » Posts tagged 'Los Angeles' (Page 2)

  • [Inner City Art]

    [Inner City Art]

    This video starts out with the videomaker Judith Binder going to a nail salon. She then visits Inner-City Art, an after-school type program for children going to school in the inner city. Following this she goes to Venice Beach and talks with a few homeless people and then tapes along the Boardwalk. Continue reading

  • L.A. “Trash” tape

    L.A. “Trash” tape

    This tape features footage that had been taped off of Los Angeles and Chicago TV stations during the production of TVTV’s “Adland.” Continue reading

  • [Making It In Hollywood raw #75]

    [Making It In Hollywood raw #75]

    Raw footage from the 1976 documentary “Making It In Hollywood”, which follows several actors as they attempt to break into the movie business. Continue reading

  • [Chicago Slices raw : Windy City West #1]

    [Chicago Slices raw : Windy City West #1]

    Raw footage for the TV program Chicago Slices. This tape documents Windy City West, a gathering of former Chicagoans now working in the entertainment industry at Ed Debevic’s in Los Angeles. It includes interviews with founder Ginny Weissman and award recipient Shelley Berman. Continue reading

  • [Chicago Slices raw : Windy City West #2]

    [Chicago Slices raw : Windy City West #2]

    Raw footage for the TV program Chicago Slices. This tape is a continuation of footage of Windy City West, a gathering of former Chicagoans now working in the entertainment industry at Ed Debevic’s in Los Angeles. It begins in the middle of the award acceptance speech by Shelley Berman. Continue reading

  • [The 90’s raw: William Armento]

    [The 90’s raw: William Armento]

    Raw tape for the award-winning series The 90’s. Videomaker Nancy Cain interviews William Armento, manager of structures for public transportation in Los Angeles, about the proposed Los Angeles subway system. He talks about the advantages of subway systems, and the difficulty of convincing some diehard car drivers to use public transportation. Despite this, Armento is still optimistic that everyone will make the switch if the public transportation is good enough. “I think the subway has a better expectation for survival in the future than the automobile.” He talks about the difficulties faced by public transit programs, as the Bush administration is threatening to cut all federal funding and force communities to fund construction themselves. Continue reading

  • Bus Riders Union

    Documentary about an activist group called the Bus Riders Union. Their focus is on improving the public transportation system in Los Angeles. The bus system there is in a sorry state. Busses are overcrowded. A rider will routinely see three busses pass her by, completely full, before being able to board. Handicapped riders find that the lift system on most busses is broken. Many riders need to take three or more busses to arrive at their destinations, and late night service on some routes is discontinued without any notice. On top of this, the MTA was planning a massive fare increase and focusing their energy on subways and trains that are costly and benefit mainly upper class white people. The B.R.U. views this struggle over Los Angeles busses as the new civil rights battle. The bus system is utilized almost exclusively by minorities and low income residents. Since the busses are so unreliable, workers are not able to predictably arrive on time and therefore have trouble holding jobs. This means that an already disadvantaged segment of the population is being further held back. Kikanza Ramsey, B.R.U. organizer, describes her organization as “an experiment to see if we can create a multi-racial, bi-lingual, gender-balanced mass movement of working class people.” The tape follows the legal struggles of the group throughout the 90’s as they battle with the city and the MTA for service improvements. Continue reading

  • L.A. Riots

    L.A. Riots

    Andrew Jones goes to Los Angeles in the aftermath of the riots of 1992. He speaks with many people about the racial issues that sparked this uprising–the feeling that blacks and Latinos had been systematically discriminated against in their own neighborhoods for years. The main complaint is that stores in their neighborhoods were owned by whites and Koreans and they were overcharged for all services and products. Much of the tension appears to be between the blacks/Latinos and the Korean shop owners. Another interesting feature of the tape is the discussion of the differing motives between rioters and looters and between the actions in different parts of the city. For example, in some areas, only specific businesses, those that were seen as longtime oppressors, were targeted. A man shows footage from his camcorder of the looting, and notes that all of the looters were white, and all were smiling. Clearly, the situation in Los Angeles was far from simple. This tape is a fascinating glimpse into the psychology of the time period. Continue reading